New Re-use Models for Waste Plastic Packaging

Emma Lundgren, Royal College of Art, 2011.


There is a growing generation of young women designers presenting innovative yet accessible ideas for reusing plastic waste materials as textile. 

Employing an array of polymers, from nylon to HDPE, these creations offer exciting new models for re-use, the slowing of disposable materials' metabolisms, localisation and inspiration.

The samples below become all the more significant when we consider the ecological impact of disposable plastics on the environment. 











Suzie Crisfield, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2008.


Designer Suzie Crisfield mixes virgin silicon with waste plastic materials to create fluid and versatile fabrics. 



Suzie Crisfield, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2008.




Suzie Crisfield, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2008.


In these samples, Suzie offers ideas for combining waste plastic with selvedge and fabric, reinvigorating the work of Luisa Cervese and passing it on another generation.



Suzie Crisfield, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2008.



Suzie Crisfield, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2008.


Tope Tijani, also a graduate of Chelsea College of Art & Design, takes similar techniques a step further by applying heat-printed plastic to contemporary jewellery. 

Her work can re-use plastics and combine it with digital print technology to create 'hybrid' commercial yet coveted pieces:





Tope Tijani, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2009.





Tope Tijani, Chelsea College of Art & Design, UAL, 2009.


Look out for Tope's bags that should be stocked at Collette
in our humble opinion!



Royal College of Art graduate, Jane Bowler, pares down sheet plastic into silhouettes that recall the exotic glamour of Isabella Blow, Alexander McQueen, John Galliano and Antonio Berardi.

Jane Bowler, Royal College of Art, 2010.



Jane Bowler, Royal College of Art, 2010.


Jane Bowler, Royal College of Art, 2010.




Jane Bowler, Royal College of Art, 2010.



Jane Bowler, Royal College of Art, 2010.



Recent Royal College of Art graduate, Jungeun Lee, moulds plastic around a wooden form to create garments that echo the voluminous work of Issey Miyake and Maria Blaisse:


Jungeun Lee, Royal College of Art, 2011.



Using similar techniques to those in Tom Dixon's Fresh Fat Plastic series and Richard Liddle 's RD4 chair, this evocative technique can employ any percentage of recycled plastic in its mix:


Jungeun Lee, Royal College of Art, 2011.



These young designers build upon the previous generations' work with plastics recycling (see Colin WilliamsonJane Atfield and Emma Neuberg) and bring us closer to interventionist styles of working/making that elevate waste plastic to treasured, even bespoke, artefact.